.

Committee Pondering Fix for School Space Crunch That May Increase FDK Offerings

The School Committee plans to vote on a short-term fix for space needs by the end of January.

Schools officials say they are inclined to build 24 modular classrooms at the elementary level, a temporary solution for Braintree's space issues that could eliminate the possibility of re-districting and may prove more feasible than opening a kindergarten center.

Superintendent Dr. Peter Kurzberg laid out several options to moderate class sizes and free up room for expected enrollment increases during the Monday night School Committee meeting.

Each possibility has its drawbacks, but Dr. Kurzberg said he prefers the addition of four modular classes at each of Braintree's six elementary schools. Unlike re-opening the Monatiquot School, building the temporary space would rely mostly on capital expenditures and may be partially funded by the Massachusetts School Building Authority.

"This would be the permanent solution, at least for a while," Dr. Kurzberg said.

Braintree has been wrestling for several years with problems associated with increasing enrollment. Schools have turned media centers, locker rooms, even hallways into classrooms, and an effort to expand full-day kindergarten in home schools is in jeopardy due to lack of space.

An influx of young families – what Mayor Joseph Sullivan calls "a good problem to have" – has added more than 600 students in grades K-12 over the last 10 years, according to data from the New England School Development Council. During that time Braintree also closed two elementary schools.

"From all indications, we're going to continue to grow," Dr. Kurzberg said. "Though maybe not at the rate we have."

Enrollment is projected to increase to 5,922 from 5,570 over the next five years. For next fall, that would mean larger-than-preferred class sizes at some schools and in some grades, and five sections for the first time in decades in first grade at Liberty Elementary, Dr. Kurzberg said.

Parents continue to register their children for kindergarten this week, and Dr. Kurzberg said he will have a better idea of September enrollment after that process is complete.

One potential casualty of the space crunch is the full-day kindergarten initiative, which began in 2011-2012 with three classrooms with 60 students at Braintree High School and grew this year to include classrooms at Flaherty, Hollis and Morrison.

If nothing is done to address space, Dr. Kurzberg said that BHS could be the only offering next year. Extra modular classrooms would most likely produce enough space at each school to allow the district to offer full-day kindergarten to "most people who would want it," he said. It would still include a fee because of associated personnel costs.

The superintendent stressed, though, that coming up with a solution is intended to relieve space stress throughout the elementary level, not soley to free up room for full-day kindergarten.

Pam Kiley, a longtime proponent of the program and of opening a kindergarten center at Monatiquot School, said she has "never been a fan of modular classrooms" and would prefer to build permanent additions.

Calling full-day kindergarten at BHS "phenomenal," Morrison parent Ellen Stenmon encouraged school officials Monday night to continue offering the program. Her daughter Lauren attended the inaugural session last year and her son Sean enters kindergarten next fall.

"She needed more, she needed that structure," Stenmon said of her daughter. "I feel very strongly that full-day kindergarten is very important for our kids."

Stenmon's concern about driving from Morrison to the high school if her son joins the program next year was echoed by Dr. Kurzberg, who said the modular classroom option would allow parents to keep their children at the same home school and avoid confusing transportation problems.

"I really don't see a negative in adding two dozen classrooms," Mayor Sullivan said. "It eliminates the need for re-districting."

Committee members will likely vote on an option at their next meeting, Jan. 28 at Braintree High School. Under that timeline, the district would be able to put the modular classrooms in place by September, or shortly thereafter, Dr. Kurzberg said.

For more details on the space solutions, visit this article: http://braintree.patch.com/articles/school-space-options-include-modular-classrooms-monatiquot-center.

Correction: Braintree closed two, not three, schools over the last 10 years. Foster actually closed more than two decades ago, according to Dr. Kurzberg. He did not have a more specific date immediately available.

Jennifer DC January 08, 2013 at 01:48 PM
Why was Braintree closing schools when enrollment is growing? How are modular classrooms going to solve the other problems identified in the consultants' report? Modular classrooms are NOT the solution - Braintree needs renovated schools - the consultants' report was pretty clear on this issue. Very disappointing.
Chet January 08, 2013 at 02:24 PM
Once again, Dr. Kurzburg pretends the population growth has somehow snuck up on him leaving him with no options. His next move will be to do nothing and eventually shift some classrooms around based on which school has the most relentless parents. Great quote: "This would be the permanent solution, at least for a while," Dr. Kurzberg said. I didn't realize "permanent" could be so fleeting.
Laura Burton January 08, 2013 at 02:41 PM
LOL Mack, I was thinking what an odd quote that was too, permanent & at least for a while...how odd!!! I truly believe the town needs to go beyond looking at just the schools, and freeze any new complexes going up, all these (fairly new) facilities (ie- Lenox Farms, Johnathans Landing, the buildings on Pond St. on West St) are not necessarily a good thing.
K January 08, 2013 at 03:17 PM
I would like to know what are the 3 elementary schools closed in the last decade. Monatiquot was closed in the mid-90s but Hollis (a much larger school) also reopened around the same time.
Joseph Markman (Editor) January 08, 2013 at 03:47 PM
K – It may be Foster that closed prior to the last decade. I apologize for the confusion. I'm double-checking on this now. Monatiquot and Eldridge closed in 2004. Hollis re-opened in 1992.
kerry January 08, 2013 at 06:11 PM
I think the 'modular classrooms available' by next fall is a good response for last night. I feel like it encompasses Option 3 of the space needs report. It avoids redistricting and adds space. Yet, I would like to hear a solution with an amendment to include a deadline for transitioning to a more substantial program with upgrades & improvements to each school.
Jennifer DC January 08, 2013 at 06:28 PM
Kerry, I'm watching the school committee now. It is NOT being presented as a temporary option, but as a lease-to-buy -- Braintree would own them after seven years. This does NOT address the other existing infrastructure issues identified in the report. It only adds classroom space.
Jennifer DC January 08, 2013 at 07:02 PM
Here is the language from the space needs study: "This variation includes additions to all of the six schools but does not include upgrades to the existing buildings. This variation is not considered an acceptable long term solution as upgrades are required and should be included in any long term solution which proposes to continue the use of the existing buildings. It should also be noted that the MSBA or the local officials having jurisdiction may not approve of building expansions without including any existing building upgrades."
Glenn Cort January 08, 2013 at 08:49 PM
Modular Classrooms has carried with it a negative connotation but without factual support. Today's modular is not yesterday's modular. They can be well lit and aesthetically pleasing environments that are of permanent design quality but capable of re location for a large district Get the facts about the quality and affordability of today's green modular spaces for educational swing space. A whole new world is available especially here in Mass. Find objective info at Triumph Modular www.triumphmodular.com.
Carolann Ricardo January 09, 2013 at 12:55 AM
How can Town Council put a $25,000 pay raise on the table for Mayor Sullivan, when CLEARLY we are searching for a economic solution to our children's current, and future education????????
Tyler Seguin January 09, 2013 at 03:30 PM
Amen Carolann!!! ( haven't heard that name since Poltergeist!)
Georgia H. January 09, 2013 at 03:48 PM
No wonder kids can't spell correctly when people who work for a school program don't know the difference between "their" and "there".
Kathleen DeWitt January 11, 2013 at 09:34 PM
Georgia, I didn't realize that teachers and or para educators were perfect. One misspelled word doesn't deserve a comment like that.

Boards

More »
Got a question? Something on your mind? Talk to your community, directly.
Note Article
Just a short thought to get the word out quickly about anything in your neighborhood.
Share something with your neighbors.What's on your mind?What's on your mind?Make an announcement, speak your mind, or sell somethingPost something
See more »